The Impact of Maternal Depression and Parent–Child Interactions on Risk of Parasitic Infections in Early Childhood: A Prospective Cohort in Benin - EHESP - École des hautes études en santé publique Access content directly
Journal Articles Maternal and Child Health Journal Year : 2021

The Impact of Maternal Depression and Parent–Child Interactions on Risk of Parasitic Infections in Early Childhood: A Prospective Cohort in Benin

Abstract

Objectives Maternal depression occurs in 13–20% of women from low-income countries, which is associated with negative child health outcomes, including diarrheal disease. However, few studies have investigated its impact on child risk of infectious disease. We studied the impacts of maternal depressive symptoms and parent–child interactions, independently, on the risk of Plasmodium falciparum malaria and soil-transmitted helminth infection in Beninese children. Methods Our population included mothers and children enrolled in a clinical trial during pregnancy (MiPPAD) in Benin. The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) assessed maternal depressive symptoms and the home observation measurement of the environment (HOME) assessed parent–child interactions. Blood and stool sample analyses diagnosed child malaria and helminth infection at 12, 18, and 24 months. Negative binomial and Poisson regression models with robust variance tested associations. Results Of the 302 mother–child pairs, 39 (12.9%) mothers had depressive symptoms. Median number of malaria episodes per child was 3 (0–14) and 29.1% children had at least one helminth infection. Higher EPDS scores were associated with lower HOME scores; relative risk (RR) 0.97 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.95, 0.99), particularly with lower acceptance, involvement, and variety subscales; RR 0.92 (95% CI 0.85, 0.99), RR 0.82 (95% CI 0.77, 0.88), RR 0.93 (95% CI 0.88, 0.99), respectively. However, neither exposure was associated with risk of parasitic infection in children. Conclusions for Practice Maternal depressive symptoms are associated with poor parent–child interactions, particularly acceptance of behavior, involvement with children, and variety of interactions, but these exposures do not independently impact risk of parasitic infection in children.

Dates and versions

hal-03467872 , version 1 (06-12-2021)

Identifiers

Cite

Amanda Garrison, Joanna Maselko, Marie-Josèphe Saurel-Cubizolles, David Courtin, Roméo Zoumenou, et al.. The Impact of Maternal Depression and Parent–Child Interactions on Risk of Parasitic Infections in Early Childhood: A Prospective Cohort in Benin. Maternal and Child Health Journal, 2021, 26 (5), pp.1049-1058. ⟨10.1007/s10995-021-03317-x⟩. ⟨hal-03467872⟩
60 View
0 Download

Altmetric

Share

Gmail Mastodon Facebook X LinkedIn More