The Bidirectional Associations Between Psychotic Experiences and DSM-IV Mental Disorders - EHESP - École des hautes études en santé publique Access content directly
Journal Articles The American Journal of Psychiatry Year : 2016

The Bidirectional Associations Between Psychotic Experiences and DSM-IV Mental Disorders

John Mcgrath
Sukanta Saha
  • Function : Author
Ali Al-Hamzawi
  • Function : Author
Laura Helena Andrade
  • Function : Author
  • PersonId : 908894
Corina Benjet
  • Function : Author
Evelyn Bromet
  • Function : Author
Mark Oakley Browne
  • Function : Author
Jose Caldas de Almeida
  • Function : Author
Wai Tat Chiu
  • Function : Author
Koen Demyttenaere
  • Function : Author
  • PersonId : 908899
John Fayyad
  • Function : Author
Silvia Florescu
  • Function : Author
Giovanni de Girolamo
Oye Gureje
Margreet ten Have
  • Function : Author
Chiyi Hu
  • Function : Author
Carmen C.W. Lim
  • Function : Author
Fernando Navarro-Mateu
  • Function : Author
Nancy Sampson
  • Function : Author
  • PersonId : 908896
Jose Posada-Villa
  • Function : Author
Kenneth Kendler
  • Function : Author
Ronald Kessler
  • Function : Author
  • PersonId : 908913

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: While it is now recognized that psychotic experiences are associated with an increased risk of later mental disorders, we lack a detailed understanding of the reciprocal time-lagged relationships between first onsets of psychotic experiences and mental disorders. Using data from World Health Organization World Mental Health (WMH) Surveys, the authors assessed the bidirectional temporal associations between psychotic experiences and mental disorders. METHOD: The WMH Surveys assessed lifetime prevalence and age at onset of psychotic experiences and 21 common DSM-IV mental disorders among 31,261 adult respondents from 18 countries. Discrete-time survival models were used to examine bivariate and multivariate associations between psychotic experiences and mental disorders. RESULTS: Temporally primary psychotic experiences were significantly associated with subsequent first onset of eight of the 21 mental disorders (major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, social phobia, posttraumatic stress disorder, adult separation anxiety disorder, bulimia nervosa, and alcohol abuse), with odds ratios ranging from 1.3 (95% CI=1.2-1.5) for major depressive disorder to 2.0 (95% CI=1.5-2.6) for bipolar disorder. In contrast, 18 of 21 primary mental disorders were significantly associated with subsequent first onset of psychotic experiences, with odds ratios ranging from 1.5 (95% CI=1.0-2.1) for childhood separation anxiety disorder to 2.8 (95% CI=1.0-7.8) for anorexia nervosa. CONCLUSIONS: While temporally primary psychotic experiences are associated with an elevated risk of several subsequent mental disorders, these data show that most mental disorders are associated with an elevated risk of subsequent psychotic experiences. Further investigation of the underlying factors accounting for these time-order relationships may shed light on the etiology of psychotic experiences.

Dates and versions

hal-02479048 , version 1 (14-02-2020)

Identifiers

Cite

John Mcgrath, Sukanta Saha, Ali Al-Hamzawi, Laura Helena Andrade, Corina Benjet, et al.. The Bidirectional Associations Between Psychotic Experiences and DSM-IV Mental Disorders. The American Journal of Psychiatry, 2016, 173 (10), pp.997-1006. ⟨10.1176/appi.ajp.2016.15101293⟩. ⟨hal-02479048⟩
25 View
0 Download

Altmetric

Share

Gmail Mastodon Facebook X LinkedIn More